koi haar gaya koi jeet gaya, ye saal bhi aakhir beet gaya.

koi haar gaya koi jeet gaya,

ye saal bhi aakhir beet gaya.

Quotes about Forgiveness

Quotes about Forgiveness
Add captionQuotes about Forgiveness

Forgive, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace. ~Author Unknown

I can forgive, but I cannot forget, is only another way of saying, I will not forgive. Forgiveness ought to be like a cancelled note — torn in two, and burned up, so that it never can be shown against one. ~Henry Ward Beecher

Forgiving is rediscovering the shining path of peace that at first you thought others took away when they betrayed you. ~Dodinsky, www.dodinsky.com

Once a woman has forgiven her man, she must not reheat his sins for breakfast. ~Marlene Dietrich

It’s easier to ask forgiveness than it is to get permission. ~Grace Hopper

The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong. ~Mahatma Gandhi

To forgive is to set a prisoner free and discover that the prisoner was you. ~Lewis B. Smedes, "Forgiveness — The Power to Change the Past," Christianity Today, 1983 January 7th (Thanks, Donna)

Forgiveness is a funny thing. It warms the heart and cools the sting. ~William Arthur Ward

Forgiveness does not change the past, but it does enlarge the future. ~Paul Boese

If you can’t forgive and forget, pick one. ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

You can make up a quarrel, but it will always show where it was patched. ~Edgar Watson Howe, Country Town Sayings, 1911

It is easier to forgive an enemy than to forgive a friend. ~William Blake, Jerusalem

Forgiveness is the sweetest revenge. ~Isaac Friedmann

[A]ll forgiveness is a gift to yourself. ~A Course in Miracles

Forgive all who have offended you, not for them, but for yourself. ~Harriet Nelson

He who cannot forgive breaks the bridge over which he himself must pass. ~George Herbert

There’s no point in burying a hatchet if you’re going to put up a marker on the site. ~Sydney Harris

Nobody forgets where he buried the hatchet. ~Frank McKinney "Kin" Hubbard, Abe Martin’s Broadcast, 1930

Yes, this is what good is: to forgive evil. There is no other good. ~Antonio Porchia,Voces, 1943, translated from Spanish by W.S. Merwin

Some forgive and forget, more forgive and remember, most forgive and remind. ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

The man who forgives is far stronger than the man who fights. ~Nathan Croall

Life is an adventure in forgiveness. ~Norman Cousins

Life becomes easier when you learn to accept an apology you never got. ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

What we forgive too freely doesn’t stay forgiven. ~Mignon McLaughlin, The Neurotic’s Notebook, 1960

It’s far easier to forgive an enemy after you’ve got even with him. ~Olin Miller

Forgiving is love’s toughest work, and love’s biggest risk. If you twist it into something it was never meant to be, it can make you a doormat or an insufferable manipulator. Forgiving seems almost unnatural. Our sense of fairness tells us people should pay for the wrong they do. But forgiving is love’s power to break nature’s rule. ~Lewis B. Smedes

To truly forgive is to let the other person forget. ~Robert Brault,rbrault.blogspot.com

      Our divine religion, the truth of which (if any history be true) is abundantly proved by historical evidence, has no need of such aids, as many are willing to give it, by asserting, that the wisest men of this world were ignorant of the two great maxims that we must act in respect of others, as we should with them to act in respect of ourselves, and that, instead of returning evil for evil, we should confer benefits even on those who injure us.... Pandits... would cite the beautiful Aryácouplet, which was written at least three centuries before our era, and which pronounces the duty of a good man, even in the moment of his destruction, to consist not only in forgiving, but even in a desire of benefiting, his destroyer, as the Sandal-tree, in the instant of its overthrow, sheds perfume on the axe, which fells it.... ~Sir William Jones, "On the Philosophy of the Asiaticks" (eleventh anniversary discourse, delivered 1794 February 20th)
      [See also] The Bard, triumphant o’er the frowns of fate,
Want, Envy, Calumny, the Tyrant’s hate,
Can conquer all things—save that inward foe,
’Tis Man’s to fight—but God’s to overthrow;
All that Revenge or Malice can contrive,
He can endure, and what is more—forgive!...
The falling Sandal-Tree sheds fragrance round,
Perfumes the axe that fells it to the ground; *
Some through their tortured trunks a balm supply,
And to give life to their destroyer—die;
And Earth’s torn, mangled breast, but yields the more,
And pours from deepest wounds her richest store.
~Charles Caleb Colton, Hypocrisy, 1812 (*citing Jones)
      [See also] Forgiveness is the perfume which flowers give when trampled upon. ~Quoted in The Sacred Circle, Volume I, edited by Judge Edmonds, Dr. Dexter, and O.G. Warren, 1855
      [See also] If, as a blind Indiana child once wrote, "forgiveness is the perfume of the violet on the heel that crushed it," gratitude may safely be characterized as the perfume of the rose on the hand that caressed it. ~Quoted in The Judge, 1916 January 8th
      There is no substantive evidence that Mark Twain crafted this metaphor. Poems with this symbolism are following a well-trodden flower-filled path. Please be careful. ~Garson O’Toole (The Quote Investigator), Forgiveness Is the Fragrance the Violet Sheds on the Heel That Has Crushed It

There is no revenge so complete as forgiveness. ~Josh Billings

Without forgiveness life is governed by... an endless cycle of resentment and retaliation. ~Roberto Assagioli

One thing you will probably remember well is any time you forgive and forget. ~Franklin P. Jones

Forgive. It doesn’t erase their crime but why should you do the time. Let go of resentment. ~Dodinsky, www.dodinsky.com

Never does the human soul appear so strong as when it forgoes revenge, and dares forgive an injury. ~E.H. Chapin

Always forgive your enemies — nothing annoys them so much. ~Oscar Wilde

Quotes about Flowers

Quotes about Flowers
Quotes about Flowers

Flowers are the sweetest things God ever made, and forgot to put a soul into. ~Henry Beecher, Life Thoughts, 1858

Earth laughs in flowers. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Hamatreya"

I'd rather have roses on my table than diamonds on my neck. ~Emma Goldman

People from a planet without flowers would think we must be mad with joy the whole time to have such things about us. ~Iris Murdoch, A Fairly Honourable Defeat

For myself I hold no preferences among flowers, so long as they are wild, free, spontaneous. Bricks to all greenhouses! Black thumb and cutworm to the potted plant! ~Edward Abbey

[F]lowers... adorn our lanes, fields and fells, and... smile upon us and cheer and bless us in our country rambles.... the lovely blossoms... kiss the clear brooks and mountain wells... ~James Rigg, "Preface," Wild Flower Lyrics and Other Poems, 1897

I will be the gladdest thing
Under the sun!
I will touch a hundred flowers
And not pick one.
~Edna St. Vincent Millay, "Afternoon on a Hill"

The temple bell stops but I still hear the sound coming out of the flowers. ~Basho

To be overcome by the fragrance of flowers is a delectable form of defeat. ~Beverly Nichols

Flowers... are a proud assertion that a ray of beauty outvalues all the utilities of the world. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1844

A morning-glory at my window satisfies me more than the metaphysics of books. ~Walt Whitman

[T]he morning-glories on the wall
Fling out their purple trumpets to the wind,—
~Elizabeth Chase Akers Allen (1832–1911), "October," c.1866

'Tis my faith that every flower
Enjoys the air it breathes!
~William Wordsworth, "Lines Written in Early Spring," Lyrical Ballads, 1798

The violets in the mountains have broken the rocks. ~Tennessee Williams

Flowers are without hope. Because hope is tomorrow and flowers have no tomorrow. ~Antonio Porchia, Voces, 1943, translated from Spanish by W.S. Merwin

Break open a cherry tree and there are no flowers, but the spring breeze brings forth myriad blossoms. ~Ikkyu Sojun

Perfumes are the feelings of flowers, and as the human heart, imagining itself alone and unwatched, feels most deeply in the night-time, so seems it as if the flowers, in musing modesty, await the mantling eventide ere they give themselves up wholly to feeling, and breathe forth their sweetest odours. Flow forth, ye perfumes of my heart, and seek beyond these mountains the dear one of my dreams! ~Heinrich Heine, "The Hartz Journey" (1824), Pictures of Travel, translated from German by Charles Godfrey Leland, 1855

Summer set lip to earth's bosom bare,
And left the flushed print in a poppy there.
~Francis Thompson, "The Poppy," 1891

How can one help shivering with delight when one's hot fingers close around the stem of a live flower, cool from the shade and stiff with newborn vigor! ~Colette

Look at us, said the violets blooming at her feet, all last winter we slept in the seeming death but at the right time God awakened us, and here we are to comfort you. ~Edward Payson Rod

Flowers seem intended for the solace of ordinary humanity. ~John Ruskin

Pluck not the wayside flower;
It is the traveler's dower.
~William Allingham

When you have only two pennies left in the world, buy a loaf of bread with one, and a lily with the other. ~Chinese Proverb

Flowers have an expression of countenance as much as men or animals. Some seem to smile; some have a sad expression; some are pensive and diffident; others again are plain, honest and upright, like the broad-faced sunflower and the hollyhock. ~Henry Ward Beecher, Star Papers: A Discourse of Flowers

Give me odorous at sunrise a garden of beautiful flowers where I can walk undisturbed. ~Walt Whitman

The first wild-flower of the year is like land after sea. ~Thomas Wentworth Higginson, "April Days," first published 1861, quoted from the 1897 edition

Flawlessly, the weather continued. As it was with the garden, so it was with the meadows. The rhomboid fields below the Blandings house lay warped on the hills, and each was a bedazzling flung scarf of wildflowers. ~Eric Hodgins, Blandings' Way, 1950

The flower is the poetry of reproduction. It is an example of the eternal seductiveness of life. ~Jean Giraudoux

Why do people give each other flowers? To celebrate various important occasions, they're killing living creatures? Why restrict it to plants? "Sweetheart, let's make up. Have this deceased squirrel." ~The Washington Post

God's grandest messages are not loudly self-assertive. His most fragrant flowers, unlike the hollyhocks and the sunflowers, do not challenge the attention of the careless wayfarer, but hide under the cool hedgerows and only betray themselves by their sweetness. Our dearest and deepest joys are not those which we have in the glare of publicity, but those which cluster round about us in the home. ~Alfred Rowland, "The Clouds: God's Angels of the Sea," in The Sunday Magazine(London), 1884

Flowers really do intoxicate me. ~Vita Sackville-West

The quality of scent or perfume is essential, and any flower that lacks perfume is far from perfect, no matter what other qualities it may possess. ~T.H. Cook, James Douglas, and J.F. McLeod, Carnations & Pinks, 1911

Flowers whisper "Beauty!" to the world, even as they fade, wilt, fall. ~Dr. SunWolf,professorsunwolf.com

Flowers are those little colorful beacons of the sun from which we get sunshine when dark, somber skies blanket our thoughts. ~Dodinsky, www.dodinsky.com

Flowers don't worry about how they're going to bloom. They just open up and turn toward the light and that makes them beautiful. ~Jim Carrey

The lovely flowers embarrass me,
They make me regret I am not a bee –
~Emily Dickinson, 1864

And then the rose-border. What intensity in those odorous buds of the Bon Silene, making the very spirit bound as though a message had reached it from heaven. And the verbena bed is compassed with fitful fragrance. Even the pansies, with their dewy eyes, are ready to rival the violets now.... Nor must the purple buds of the calycanthus be forgotten. 'Sweet-scented shrub' indeed; for let me hide but a single one of these in some fold of my dress, and the spices of Araby will float around me till the evening. ~Sarah Smiley

The artist is the confidant of nature, flowers carry on dialogues with him through the graceful bending of their stems and the harmoniously tinted nuances of their blossoms. Every flower has a cordial word which nature directs towards him. ~Auguste Rodin

The flower offered of itself
And eloquently spoke
Of Gods
In languages of rainbows
And secret silence...
~Phillip Pulfrey, from Love, Abstraction and other Speculations, www.originals.net

Every flower is a soul blossoming in nature. ~Gerard de Nerval

There is that in the glance of a flower which may at times control the greatest of creation's braggart lords. ~John Muir, 1867 October 19th, A Thousand-Mile Walk To the Gulf

With daffodils mad footnotes for the spring,
And asters purple asterisks for autumn -
~Conrad Aiken, Preludes for Memnon, 1930

Next to the rose, whose divine right to monarchy cannot be questioned, the violet is the poet's flower. ~Willis Boyd Allen, "The Violet Book," 1909

The poet's darling. ~William Wordsworth, "To the Daisy"

The Eglantine Rose.... has always been considered as the poet's flower... ~George William Francis, The Favorites of the Flower Garden, 1844

Ah, Rose! had'st thou but Beauty's charms
Thou ne'er had been the poet's flower:
Extended on thy thorny arms
Thou had'st not wielded sovereign power...
~James Rigg, "To the Fragrance of the Rose," Wild Flower Lyrics and Other Poems, 1897

Bread feeds the body, indeed, but flowers feed also the soul. ~The Koran

If dandelions were hard to grow, they would be most welcome on any lawn. ~Andrew Mason

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze
Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
~William Wordsworth, "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud," 1804

Against a dark sky all flowers look like fireworks. There is something strange about them, at once vivid and secret, like flowers traced in fire in the phantasmal garden of a witch. ~G.K. Chesterton, Alarms and Discursions, "The Glory of Grey"

I perhaps owe having become a painter to flowers. ~Claude Monet

The flowers of late winter and early spring occupy places in our hearts well out of proportion to their size. ~Gertrude S. Wister

Springtime flowers bloom like colorful arrows piercing their way to the sun. ~Terri Guillemets

...See Hieracium's various tribe,
Of plumy seed and radiate flowers,
The course of Time their blooms describe,
And wake or sleep appointed hours....
~Charlotte Turner Smith (1749–1806), "The Horologe of the Fields" Addressed to a Young Lady, on seeing at the House of an Acquaintance a magnificent French Timepiece, published 1807

...Broad o'er its imbricated cup
The Goatsbeard spreads its golden rays,
But shuts its cautious petals up,
Retreating from the noon-tide blaze...
~Charlotte Turner Smith (1749–1806), "The Horologe of the Fields"

...Silene, who declines
The garish noontide's blazing light;
But when the evening crescent shines,
Gives all her sweetness to the night....
~Charlotte Turner Smith (1749–1806), "The Horologe of the Fields"

...Thus in each flower and simple bell,
      That in our path untrodden lie,
      Are sweet remembrancers who tell
      How fast the winged moments fly.
Time will steal on with ceaseless pace,
      Yet lose we not the fleeting hours,
      Who still their fairy footsteps trace,
      As light they dance among the flowers.
~Charlotte Turner Smith (1749–1806), "The Horologe of the Fields" Addressed to a Young Lady, on seeing at the House of an Acquaintance a magnificent French Timepiece, published 1807

Mrs. C. Smith, in her last poetical volume, which, alas, is truly a legacy, has fully vindicated her pretensions to the laurel. Her love of Botany, as well as of Poetry, often leads her to the fields, and she suffers not a flower to remain unsung. The thought, in [The Horologe of the Fields], is fanciful, the descriptions are accurate, and the moral excellent. ~Oliver Oldschool, The Port Folio (New Series), 1807 December 12th, Philadelphia

Can we conceive what humanity would be if it did not know the flowers? ~Maurice Maeterlinck

From boyhood I have been in love with the Wildlings: I rank them among my teachers and preachers. To me, as to thousands, they ever seem to whisper such sweet things, and tell such strange and fairy-like stories of their present and past existence, that they appeal to the highest faculties of our being. ~James Rigg, "Preface," Wild Flower Lyrics and Other Poems, 1897  #wildflowers

I stood in the Maytime meadows
By roses circled round,
Where many a fragile blossom
Was bright upon the ground...
~Volkslied (German folk song)

A flower's appeal is in its contradictions — so delicate in form yet strong in fragrance, so small in size yet big in beauty, so short in life yet long on effect. ~Terri Guillemets

Said the other, little daisy, "I am very well content
      To live simply in the meadow where the sun and rain are sent;
      Where the bees all gather sweetness, and the dew falls on my head,
      And the radiance of the moonlight is all around me shed.
"The grass and clover blossoms admire my beauty all day long,
      As I listen to the music of a bird's delightful song..."
~Gertrude Tooley Buckingham, "Two Little Daisies" (1940s)  [The other little daisy was wishing to be a rose. —tεᖇᖇ¡·g]

You can see the goldenrod, that most tenacious and pernicious and beauteous of all New England flora, bowing away from the wind like a great and silent congregation. ~Stephen King, 'Salem's Lot

Let us dance in the sun, wearing wild flowers in our hair... ~Susan Polis Shutz

Wandering through the woodlands, we cannot fail to notice a small white, delicate, bell-shaped flower, which blooms freely in the shady place, yet may often be found decking the high mountain. It is the pretty wood-sorrel (Oxalis acetosella).... It was found by Captain Parry in places where scarcely any other flower ventured to blossom.... It is a humble little flower, lowly in growth, its delicate pearl-white petals elegantly veined with purple lines.... Almost as beautiful is its bright green triplet leaf, shaped like three small hearts joined together at the points, and which spring profusely around the blossoms. It is the most sensitive wilding we have; for so soon as the evening dews begin to fall, it droops its leaves around the stems, and ever seems to shrink at the approach of night, or the faintest whisper of a coming storm. ~Leigh Page, Stars of the Earth: Or, Wild Flowers of the Months, 1868 [Behind Shelley's "sensitive plant" (mimosa pudica, el morí-viví), this is a great candidate to be the floral symbol of the HSP-INFJ! —tεᖇᖇ¡·g]

The flower that follows the sun does so even in cloudy days. ~Robert Leighton

I wonder if the Daffodil
Shrinks from the touch of frost,
And when her veins grow stiff and still
She dreams that life is lost?
Ah, if she does, how sweet a thing
Her resurrection day in spring!
~Emma C. Dowd, "Daffodil and Crocus," in Country Life in America: A Magazine for the Home-maker, the Vacation-seeker, the Gardener, the Farmer, the Nature-teacher, the Naturalist, April 1902

[L]et us linger awhile in the wonderful old Lilac walk. It is a glory of tender green and shaded amethyst and grateful hum of bees, the very voice of Spring. Every sense is gratified, even that of touch, when the delicate plumes of the fragrant Lilac blossoms brush your cheek as you walk through its path; there is no spot of fairer loveliness than this Lilac walk in May. It is a wonderful study of flickering light and grateful shade in midsummer.... The very spirit of the Lilacs seems visible, etched with a purity of touch that makes them sentient, speaking beings, instead of silent plants. ~Alice Morse Earle, "In Lilac Tide," Old-Time Gardens Newly Set Forth, 1901

I like to think a flower opens itself to outgrow its plantedness. That it yearns to be carried away. ~Author Unknown

Being perfect artists and ingenuous poets, the Chinese have piously preserved the love and holy cult of flowers; one of the very rare and most ancient traditions which has survived their decadence. And since flowers had to be distinguished from each other, they have attributed graceful analogies to them, dreamy images, pure and passionate names which perpetuate and harmonize in our minds the sensations of gentle charm and violent intoxication with which they inspire us. So it is that certain peonies, their favorite flower, are saluted by the Chinese, according to their form or color, by these delicious names, each an entire poem and an entire novel:The Young Girl Who Offers Her Breasts, or: The Water That Sleeps Beneath the Moon, or: The Sunlight in the Forest, or: The First Desire of the Reclining Virgin, or: My Gown Is No Longer All White Because in Tearing It the Son of Heaven Left a Little Rosy Stain; or, even better, this one: I Possessed My Lover in the Garden. ~Octave Mirbeau, Torture Garden, "The Garden"  [If you are interested in writings on the names of flowers, see also Thomas Wentworth Higginson's beautiful essay "April Days" from the 1800s. —tεᖇᖇ¡·g]

A profusion of pink roses bending ragged in the rain speaks to me of all gentleness and its enduring. ~The Collected Later Poems of William Carlos Williams

Flowers have spoken to me more than I can tell in written words. They are the hieroglyphics of angels, loved by all men for the beauty of their character, though few can decipher even fragments of their meaning. ~Lydia M. Child

Have you ever seen a flower down
Sometimes angels skip around
And in their blissful state of glee
Bump into a daisy or sweet pea.
~Terri Guillemets

But as for the particular William in deference to whom a rosy summer flower is called "sweet," I am inclined to regard him as a somewhat lackadaisical fellow. By a coincidence the flower, which is not remarkably elegant or graceful—on the contrary, it is an erect, sturdy, bunch plant, with the blossom for the most part of a bright pronounced crimson, when it is not pied or entirely white, and quite without scent—it is known in France as "the Poet's Pink." Sweet William considered poetic by our fastidious French neighbours! I should as soon, pleasant flower as it is, look for poetry in a cabbage. Our English poets had more reason when they loved and proclaimed their love for the yellow daffodil, the old "daffondowndillly," breaking into different shades of yellow, from rich amber to palest maize, with its tall stalks, nodding heads, and long lance-shaped leaves, the tint of green oats, which form an exquisite setting... ~Sarah Tytler, Footprints: Nature Seen on its Human Side, 1881  [Œillet de poëte, in the French. —tεᖇᖇ¡·g]

Even if you think the Big Bang created the stars, don't you wonder who sent the flowers? ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

I hope some day to meet God, because I want to thank Him for the flowers. ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

If you've never been thrilled to the very edges of your soul by a flower in spring bloom, maybe your soul has never been in bloom. ~Terri Guillemets

You can't be suspicious of a tree, or accuse a bird or a squirrel of subversion or challenge the ideology of a violet. ~Hal Borland, Sundial of the Seasons, 1964

God loved the flowers and invented soil. Man loved the flowers and invented vases. ~Variation of a saying by Jacques Deval (God loved the birds and invented trees. Man loved the birds and invented cages.)

Quotes about Flirt

Quotes about Flirt
Quotes about Flirt
To avoid mistakes and regrets, always consult your wife before engaging in a flirtation.  ~E.W. Howe

If you're a gifted flirt, talking about the price of eggs will do as well as any other subject.  ~Mignon McLaughlin, The Neurotic's Notebook, 1960

Flirtation:  attention without intention.  ~Max O'Rell, John Bull and His Island

Women flirt to keep their stock high, men to get somewhere.  ~Mignon McLaughlin, The Neurotic's Notebook, 1960

The greatest miracle of love is the cure of coquetry.  ~François Duc de la Rochefoucauld, Maxims

Why does a man take it for granted that a girl who flirts with him wants him to kiss her - when, nine times out of ten, she only wants him to want to kiss her?  ~Helen Rowland

Women know not the whole of their coquetry.  ~François Duc de la Rochefoucauld,Maxims

Beauty is power; a smile is its sword.  ~Charles Reade

The coquets of both sexes are self-lovers, and that is a love no other whatever can dispossess.  ~John Gay, The Beggar's Opera

Coquetry is the essential characteristic, and the prevalent humor of women; but they do not all practice it, because the coquetry of some is restrained by fear or by reason.  ~François Duc de la Rochefoucauld, Maxims

Coquetry whets the appetite; flirtation depraves it.  Coquetry is the thorn that guards the rose - easily trimmed off when once plucked.  Flirtation is like the slime on water-plants, making them hard to handle, and when caught, only to be cherished in slimy waters.  ~Ik Marvel

Quotes about Family

Quotes about Family
Quotes about Family

I don’t care how poor a man is; if he has family, he’s rich. ~Dan Wilcox and Thad Mumford, "Identity Crisis," M*A*S*H

Rejoice with your family in the beautiful land of life! ~Albert Einstein

It is not flesh and blood but the heart which makes us fathers and sons. ~Johann Schiller

The family is a haven in a heartless world. ~Attributed to Christopher Lasch

The truth is maybe we are just average. But the way I see it — families where parents get up every morning and go to jobs that are hard so they can get their kids through school and through life, and struggle to make it all work and manage to do it with dignity and a little humor — well, that's not average. That's extraordinary. ~DeAnn Heline and Eileen Heisler, The Middle, "Average Rules" (S1, E24, original airdate 2010 May 19th), spoken by the character Frankie Heck

Nobody has ever before asked the nuclear family to live all by itself in a box the way we do. With no relatives, no support, we’ve put it in an impossible situation. ~Margaret Mead

Families are like fudge — mostly sweet with a few nuts. ~Author Unknown

The thing about family disasters is that you never have to wait long before the next one puts the previous one into perspective. ~Robert Brault,rbrault.blogspot.com

If you don’t believe in ghosts, you’ve never been to a family reunion. ~Ashleigh Brilliant

We all grow up with the weight of history on us. Our ancestors dwell in the attics of our brains as they do in the spiraling chains of knowledge hidden in every cell of our bodies. ~Shirley Abbott

Family: A social unit where the father is concerned with parking space, the children with outer space, and the mother with closet space. ~Evan Esar

A family is a unit composed not only of children but of men, women, an occasional animal, and the common cold. ~Ogden Nash

The family. We were a strange little band of characters trudging through life sharing diseases and toothpaste, coveting one another’s desserts, hiding shampoo, borrowing money, locking each other out of our rooms, inflicting pain and kissing to heal it in the same instant, loving, laughing, defending, and trying to figure out the common thread that bound us all together. ~Erma Bombeck

When you look at your life, the greatest happinesses are family happinesses. ~Joyce Brothers

In some families, please is described as the magic word. In our house, however, it was sorry. ~Margaret Laurence

Family quarrels have a total bitterness unmatched by others. Yet it sometimes happens that they also have a kind of tang, a pleasantness beneath the unpleasantness, based on the tacit understanding that this is not for keeps; that any limb you climb out on will still be there later for you to climb back. ~Mignon McLaughlin, The Neurotic’s Notebook, 1960

You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them. ~Desmond Tutu

An ounce of blood is worth more than a pound of friendship. ~Spanish Proverb

Blood’s thicker than water, and when one’s in trouble
Best to seek out a relative’s open arms.
~Author Unknown

The happiness of the domestic fireside is the first boon of Heaven; and it is well it is so, since it is that which is the lot of the mass of mankind. ~Thomas Jefferson, 1813

To us, family means putting your arms around each other and being there. ~Barbara Bush

When our relatives are at home, we have to think of all their good points or it would be impossible to endure them. ~George Bernard Shaw

Call it a clan, call it a network, call it a tribe, call it a family. Whatever you call it, whoever you are, you need one. ~Jane Howard

In a houseful of toddlers and pets, you can start out having a bad day, but you keep getting detoured. ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

There is no cure for laziness but a large family helps. ~Herbert Prochnov

Family quarrels are bitter things. They don’t go by any rules. They’re not like aches or wounds; they’re more like splits in the skin that won’t heal because there’s not enough material. ~F. Scott Fitzgerald

Our most basic instinct is not for survival but for family. Most of us would give our own life for the survival of a family member, yet we lead our daily life too often as if we take our family for granted. ~Paul Pearshall

The great advantage of living in a large family is that early lesson of life’s essential unfairness. ~Nancy Mitford

Having a place to go — is a home. Having someone to love — is a family. Having both — is a blessing. ~Donna Hedges

’Ohana means family — no one gets left behind, and no one is ever forgotten. ~Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois, Lilo & Stitch

The happiest moments of my life have been the few which I have passed at home in the bosom of my family. ~Thomas Jefferson

And thank you for a house full of people I love. Amen. ~Terri Guillemets

The family — that dear octopus from whose tentacles we never quite escape, nor, in our inmost hearts, ever quite wish to. ~Dodie Smith

Family life is a bit like a runny peach pie — not perfect but who’s complaining? ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

The great gift of family life is to be intimately acquainted with people you might never even introduce yourself to, had life not done it for you. ~Kendall Hailey,The Day I Became an Autodidact

In time of test, family is best. ~Burmese Proverb

Family is just accident.... They don’t mean to get on your nerves. They don’t even mean to be your family, they just are. ~Marsha Norman

The only rock I know that stays steady, the only institution I know that works is the family. ~Lee Iacocca

Friends are God’s apology for relations. ~Hugh Kingsmill

They... threw themselves into the interests of the rest, but each plowed his or her own furrow. Their thoughts, their little passions and hopes and desires, all ran along separate lines. Family life is like this — animated, but collateral. ~Rose Macaulay

What greater thing is there for human souls than to feel that they are joined for life — to be with each other in silent unspeakable memories. ~George Eliot

At the end of the day, a loving family should find everything forgivable. ~Mark V. Olsen and Will Sheffer, Big Love, "Easter"

If the family were a fruit, it would be an orange, a circle of sections, held together but separable — each segment distinct. ~Letty Cottin Pogrebin

In a household of toddlers and pets, we discover this rule of thumb about happy families — that they are least two-thirds incontinent. ~Robert Brault,rbrault.blogspot.com

The informality of family life is a blessed condition that allows us to become our best while looking our worst. ~Marge Kennedy

The family is one of nature’s masterpieces. ~George Santayana, The Life of Reason

A family is a bunch of people who keep confusing you with someone you were as a kid. ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

We cannot destroy kindred: our chains stretch a little sometimes, but they never break. ~Marquise de Sévigné

The advantage of growing up with siblings is that you become very good at fractions. ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

Other things may change us, but we start and end with the family. ~Anthony Brandt

There’s an awful lot of blood around that water is thicker than. ~Mignon McLaughlin, The Second Neurotic’s Notebook, 1966

Family faces are magic mirrors. Looking at people who belong to us, we see the past, present, and future. ~Gail Lumet Buckley

If minutes were kept of a family gathering, they would show that "Members not Present" and "Subjects Discussed" were one and the same. ~Robert Brault,rbrault.blogspot.com

The house of the childless is empty; and so is the heart of him that hath no wife. ~Hitopadesa

Are we not like two volumes of one book? ~Marceline Desbordes-Valmore

I don’t have to look up my family tree, because I know that I’m the sap. ~Fred Allen

What greater blessing to give thanks for at a family gathering than the family and the gathering. ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

Go home, find a wench, raise fat babies, live a good long life. ~R. Scott Gemmill & Gil Grant, NCIS: Los Angeles, "Brimstone" (S1, E10, 2009, Hetty Lange)

The lack of emotional security of our American young people is due, I believe, to their isolation from the larger family unit. No two people — no mere father and mother — as I have often said, are enough to provide emotional security for a child. He needs to feel himself one in a world of kinfolk, persons of variety in age and temperament, and yet allied to himself by an indissoluble bond which he cannot break if he could, for nature has welded him into it before he was born. ~Pearl S. Buck

Quotes about Failure

Quotes about Failure
Quotes about Failure
If you're doing your best, you won't have any time to worry about failure. ~Quoted in P.S. I Love You, compiled by H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

Failure is an event, never a person. ~William D. Brown, Welcome Stress!

The only time you don't fail is the last time you try anything — and it works. ~William Strong

I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~Thomas Edison

I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody. ~Bill Cosby

There is no failure except in no longer trying. ~Elbert Hubbard

Supposing you have tried and failed again and again. You may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing we call "failure" is not the falling down, but the staying down. ~Mary Pickford

Try again. Fail again. Fail better. ~Samuel Beckett

Failure doesn't mean you are a failure... it just means you haven't succeeded yet. ~Robert Schuller

One fails forward toward success. ~Charles F. Kettering

One must be a god to be able to tell successes from failures without making a mistake. ~Anton Chekhov

A man may fall many times, but he won't be a failure until he says that someone pushed him. ~Elmer G. Letterman

If by a failure you mean an attempt — yes, you're right. ~Rudolf Besier, The Barretts of Wimpole Street: A Comedy in Three Acts, 1930 (Elizabeth Barrett to Robert Browning)

Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat. ~F. Scott Fitzgerald

Just once it might be instructive to pretend you're accepting an award for failure, just to see who you would thank. ~Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com

In a world flagrant with the failures of civilization, what is there particularly immortal about our own? ~G.K. Chesterton

They say President Wilson has blundered. Perhaps he has, but I notice he usually blunders forward. ~Thomas Edison

There are defeats more triumphant than victories. ~Michel de Montaigne

Failure sometimes enlarges the spirit. You have to fall back upon humanity and God. ~Charles Horton Cooley

Whenever you leave behind failure you’re doing good. If you think everything you’ve done is great, you’re probably dumb. ~Louis C.K.

Notice the difference between what happens when a man says to himself, "I have failed three times," and what happens when he says, "I am a failure." ~S.I. Hayakawa

A failure is a man who has blundered, but is not able to cash in the experience. ~Elbert Hubbard

No man is a failure who is enjoying life. ~William Feather

Failure is only the opportunity to begin again more intelligently. ~Henry Ford

Because a fellow has failed once or twice or a dozen times, you don't want to set him down as a failure till he's dead or loses his courage. ~George Horace Lorimer

You can't have any successes unless you can accept failure. ~George Cukor

There is no failure. Only feedback. ~Robert Allen

Failure changes for the better, success for the worse. ~Lucius Annaeus Seneca

There is much to be said for failure. It is more interesting than success. ~Max Beerbohm, Mainly on the Air, 1946

You always pass failure on your way to success. ~Mickey Rooney

Nothing fails like success because we don't learn from it. We learn only from failure. ~Kenneth Boudling

Our business in life is not to succeed, but to continue to fail in good spirits. ~Robert Louis Stevenson

It is a mistake to suppose that people succeed through success; they often succeed through failures. ~Author Unknown

The men who try to do something and fail are infinitely better than those who try to do nothing and succeed. ~Lloyd Jones
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